List of Gun Manufacturers and if They Are Made in the USA

It’s important to know where your firearms come from if you are a conscious consumer who wants to make sure your money is only going to places you support.

IMPORTANT NOTE! I took the time to call about 90% of the companies on this list to verify which models are “Made in the USA.” So I’ve gone to every extent I can to find each product’s origin; however, I can’t know who their suppliers are. You will need to do additional research if you wish to know where each component comes from, where the metals come from, etc.

CompanyWhere It’s MadeNote
ArmaliteUSAArmalite is based in Arizona, where it manufactures its firearms. Armalite is owned by Strategic Armory Corp. Most “AR” style firearms are not produced by Armalite.
BarrettUSABarrett manufactures its firearms in the USA. It is headquartered in Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
Bear Creek ArsenalUSABear Creek Arsenal is headquartered in Sanford, North Carolina where it manufactures all of its firearms.
BenelliItalyBenelli manufactures all of its firearms in Italy where the company is headquartered. They have a non-manufacturing office in Accokeek, Maryland.
BerettaItaly and USABeretta manufactures firearms in Italy and Tennessee. The Bobcat, Tomcat, 1301, some 92X handguns, and some a300 shotguns are made in the USA.
BlaserGermanyBlaser manufactures its firearms in Isny im Allgäu, Germany. They have a non-manufacturing office in San Antonio, Texas.
BrowningUSA, Japan, Portugal, BelgiumWhile Browning is a USA company with headquarters in Utah, it partners with foreign manufacturers to produce most of its products. Only the Buck Mark, 1911-22, and 1911-380 pistols are made in the USA. Most of its guns are produced in Japan, but some are produced in Portugal and Belgium. Browning is owned by FN, which is headquartered in Belgium.
BushmasterUSAAll Bushmaster firearms are made in the USA. It is headquartered in Carson City, Nevada.
CanikTurkeyCanik engineers and manufactures all of its firearms in Turkey. It is named after a mountain in northern Turkey.
Charles DalyVariousThe Charles Daly trademark has traded hands and has been used to brand firearms manufactured in Italy, Turkey, the Phillippines, USA, and Israel.
ChiappaItalyAll Chiappa firearms are manufactured in Italy. The company has a US presence in Dayton, Ohio.
ChristensenUSAAll Christensen Firearms are made in the USA. Its headquarters and manufacturing facility is in Gunnison, Utah.
ColtUSA with ties to the Czech RepublicColt firearms are generally manufactured in the USA, but CZ, a Czech company, owns the brand and may move some of its manufacturing abroad.
CZCzech Republic and USAZČeská zbrojovka does most of its manufacturing in the Czech Republic, but makes the P-10 series handgun and the Scorpion in Kansas City, Kansas. CZ also owns Colt.
Daniel DefenseUSADaniel Defense firearms are manufactured in the USA. They have manufacturing facilities in Georgia and South Carolina.
FierceUSA and CanadaThe Fierce Rival is Produced in the USA, but the Fierce Edge is Manufactured in Canada.
FN HerstalUSA and BelgiumAll FN firearms purchased in the USA are also manufactured in the USA, except the FN Five-SeveN, which is made in Belgium. FN has a US subsidiary, but the parent company is from Belgium.
FranchiItalyFranchi makes its rifles in Italy. Franchi is owned by Benelli, which is also an Italian company.
GlockAustria and USAGlock manufactures most of its firearms in Austria, but does some manufacturing in the USA. The Glock 42 is only manufactured in the United States, but some serial numbers of other Glock lines are also produced in the USA as well as Austria.
HenryUSAHenry firearms are made in the USA. After all, their tagline is “Made in the USA, or not at all.”
HeritageUSAHeritage Firearms is owned by Taurus, which has facilities in the USA and Brazil; however, all Heritage products are made in the USA.
HK (Heckler and Koch)Germany, USAMost HK firearms are made in Germany, but they do some manufacturing in the USA and are continuing to expand their USA manufacturing.
HowaJapanAll Howa rifles are manufactured in Japan.
IWIIsrael, USAIWI makes most of its products in Israel. The only product it produces 100% in the USA is the Zion AR. Some of its products use partial USA manufacturing for 922R compliance.
KalashnikovUSAAll Kalashnikov firearms are now made in the USA. While the company has Russian roots, it now operates in Florida where it produces all of the company’s guns.
Kel-TecUSAAll Kel-Tec firearms are made in the USA. The company is headquartered in Florida.
KimberUSAKimber firearms are made in Troy, Alabama. The company was previously headquartered in New York, but moved its headquarters due to New York’s gun laws.
MarlinUSAMarlin firearms are made in the USA. Marlin is owned by Ruger, which is also a USA company.
MauserGermanyOwned by Blaser.
MossbergUSA, TurkeyMost Mossberg firearms are made in the USA, except for its over-under shotguns and rimfire guns which are made in Turkey. The company is headquartered in Connecticut, but most of its manufacturing is done in Texas.
Rem Arms (Remington)USARem Arms is headquartered and does all of its manufacturing in LaGrange, Georgia.
RugerUSAAll Ruger firearms are made in the USA. It has facilities in Arizona, North Carolina, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. Ruger owns Marlin.
SakoFinlandAll Sako firearms are engineered and manufactured in Finland.
SarsilmazTurkeySarsilmaz engineers and manufactures its firearms in Turkey. It is the largest firearms manufacturer in Turkey, having been in business since 1880.
SavageUSA and CanadaMost Savage products, including all Savage 110 models, are manufactured in the USA. Most or all of its rimfire products, as well as the Series 64, are manufactured in Canada.
Seekins PrecisionUSASeekins Precision manufactures its firearms in Lewiston, Idaho.
Sig SauerUSAAll Sig Sauer firearms are made in the USA. The company was founded in Switzerland and had ties to Germany early on, but for decades now, all firearms have been made in the USA.
Smith & WessonUSAAll Smith and Wesson firearms are made in the USA.
Springfield ArmoryUSA and CroatiaAll Springfield Armory firearms today are made in the USA, except for the XD line of pistols which is made in a Springfield-owned facility in Croatia. Their 1911 models had frames and slides manufactured in Brazil until 2010, but now they are all made in the USA. The company is headquartered in Geneseo, Illinois.
SteyrUSA, AustriaSteyr is an Austrian company, but operates a small manufacturing facility in Alabama to make some of their guns in the USA.
StoegerItalyOwned by Benelli/Beretta.
TaurusUSA and BrazilTaurus makes firearms in Brazil and the USA. For example, the GX4 parts are manufactured in Brazil, and assembled in Bainbridge, Georgia. Taurus firearms which receive the “Heritage” branding are made in Bainbridge, Georgia. Firearms with the “Rossi” branding are made in Porto Alegre, Brazil.
Thompson CenterUSAThompson Center is owned by Smith & Wesson.
TikkaFinlandAll Tikka guns are engineered and manufactured in Finland. Tikka is owned by Sako, a Finnish company.
VudooUSAVudoo has an office in St. George, Utah where they design and manufacture all of their rifles. The CEO of Vudoo, Paul Parrot, is a US Army veteran.
WaltherUSA, GermanyWalther manufactures firearms in the USA and Germany. The PPK, 380, and newer models of the PPS are produced in the USA. Check your serial number or the “Made in” stamp on the gun to know where yours was produced.
WeatherbyUSA and JapanWeatherby rifles are manufactured both in the United States and in Japan. The Mark V line is all manufactured in the USA, but the Vanguard line is made in Japan. Weatherby is headquartered in Sheridan, Wyoming.
Wilson CombatUSAWilson Combat is headquartered in Berryville, Arkansas.
WinchesterBelgium, Turkey, Japan, PortugalWinchester firearms are made in the USA, Belgium, Turkey, and Portugal. Its SX3 and model 101 are made in Belgium and assembled in Portugal. Its Model 70, XPR, and SX4 are made in Portugal. Its SXP and Wildcat are made in Turkey. Most of its lever guns are made in Japan. Winchester is owned by FN, which is headquartered in Belgium.
ZastavaSerbiaZastava manufactures all of its firearms in Serbia.

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5 Comments

  1. Vincent Keith says:

    I can’t believe you left out Sako and Tikka. (Yeah, I know, same company)

    1. Jim Harmer says:

      Sheesh! Sorry about that! I must have been asleep at the wheel. I’ll update.

  2. ron broberg says:

    Love backfire….60 years old….live in MN…first got into pheasant hunting at age 45….as a kid i had played so much hockey and i didn’t have time for anything else….never owned a shot gun, truck or dog before then….got hooked……never went deer hunting till this fall….harvested my first deer this fall….thanks for sharing your faith….appreciate all your research regarding firearms…..looking to buy a gun for elk hunting….am i good to buy a Springfield 2020 way point in 6.5 prc….want to be able to have the ability if necessary to harvest it at 400 yards ….also want to limit recoil….your thoughts are much appreciated….

    1. Jim Harmer says:

      I think that’d be a great choice. 6.5 PRC in a Waypoint for limited recoil elk hunting is a great match.

  3. Could you please do a review on the Sauer 100 stainless xta. I’m really interested in them but can hardly find a proper review of them.

    They are built in the same factory where they produce Mauser and Blaser rifles (all owned by the same company), so I guess “quality” shouldn’t be an issue but unlike Mausers and Blasers, these rifles are far less expensive.

    They come in the same price bracket as Tikka rifles but from what I have read, unlike the popular T3X rifles, Sauer 100 rifles 1. can be top loaded,
    2. have a metal finish at the trigger-guard,
    3. and three-stage safety.
    And contrary to most German rifles today, the barrel is threaded into the reciever (not heat shrunk).

    The only downsides I have read of it is its screw-on bolt-knob and the fact that you may need a few more tools to disassemble the rifle. But honestly these are not deal-breakers (or at least I think so).

    I’m sure a video review by you would certainly help clarify and perhaps sway my views on the Sauer 100s.